Malta Piano Festival 2022, alan Cassar.jpg
Alan Cassar

Alan Casar is UK-based composer born in Malta in 1974, Cassar studied oboe with Pierre Grech

and harmony and counterpoint with Ronnie Debattista. Betwen 1995 and 1998 he studied at the
Conservatoire National de Region in Lyon where he graduated with a gold medal in composition, electroacoustic music, stylistic harmony and counterpoint. Soon after, he continued his studies at the Conservatoire National Superieur de Musique et Danse in Lyon where he studied composition, computer music, and film music with personalities such as Marco Stroppa and Denis Lorrain. In parallel to this,

he attended Gilbert Amy's conducting seminars. After his graduation in 2002, Cassar decided to broaden his music expertise via a 20th century musicology course at Master’s level at the Sorbonne University in Paris – a course he accomplished in one year. His research was supervised by Marc Battier from IRCAM.
During his study period, Cassar attended masterclasses with some of the world’s foremost composers including Eötvös, Ferneyhough, Grisey, Harvey, Manoury, and Risset. Through his several teachers, he received a tradition passed down directly from Messiaen, Pierre Schaeffer, Xenakis and institutions such as GRM and IRCAM. Perception, modelling, music synthesis and musical representation are amongst his
research foci. Cassar divides his time between several artistic and educational activities. He writes a range of works for different ensembles and media and regularly works with high- profile musicians who commission his work.

"Maybe Rain" by Alan Cassar 

One could possibly describe 'Maybe Rain' as a conceptual work that is mainly based on a number of perception-based questions such as: What is complexity?  When is a work perceived as 'complex'? Can a work be ambivalently complex and simple?

 

The work makes an oblique reference to easy-listening piano pieces. It embraces paradoxes, uncertainties, and grey areas in perception. The initial bareness develops and the work  evolves into a complex, multi-layered composition with a non-linear narrative without losing the apparent simplicity. 

 

The title refers to the aforementioned uncertainties ('maybe'), and the fluid textures (hence 'rain').